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What is My College Calculator?

My College Calculator uses the latest 2019 college admissions data to estimate your potential rate of acceptance. The characteristics of your application might give you higher or lower odds of admission compared to the average applicant for that college. With our college chances calculator, you can compare your modified acceptance rate across different colleges and between the early or regular application cycles. (And don't fret! If your odds come out less than you hope, rewrite those odds by putting discipline into your community service, extracurriculars, written application, testing, and even letters of recommendation!)

A college’s reported admissions rate can only tell you so much. Most colleges simply take the total number of applicants and divide it by the amount of admitted students. However, it is common knowledge that your test scores, high school type, and many other factors have an impact on your odds of getting in. Our college chances calculator helps you with this issue by estimating your personalized chance for admission.

If anything, our calculator shows little difference across most calculation results. Working hard on crafting strong writing applications and showing passion can increase your odds by far higher levels than any of these variations. My College Calculator seeks to promote mental health awareness while tackling an often challenging process. To all high school juniors and seniors currently looking at colleges, we support you! If at any moment the moment seems particularly stressful or difficult, do not hesitate to seek support, both social or professional. Kindness to oneself should never be overlooked as a part of the college process.

No email address or account is required for our calculator! Your personal data will never be collected. Punch in some factors and estimate your chances!

How Do I Use The College Chances Calculator?

Choose at least one college and an admissions cycle. Then, select at three of the remaining factors. Finally, compare at the results screen!

Is My Acceptance Rate Accurate?

Any percentage for admissions rates you find on our college chances calculator is no guarantee of your probability of acceptance. Our tool only accounts for a few factors and has not been endorsed by any college admissions office within the Ivy League or otherwise. Instead, our college chances calculator is meant to provide a general indicator of your admission chances based on some components of your application. There can be significant variability in accuracy, and it is important to recognize controllable factors of your application, including essays and passion, have a far greater weight on your chances of admissions.


My Odds Were Less Than I Had Hoped.

Take our calculations with a grain of salt! Our calculator has a wide margin of error and only looks at a few variables. Again, the influence of controllable factors of your application — dedication to extracurriculars or strong character assessments play a much higher role than these demographic measurements. Don't forget, thousands of surprised students get in each year! Colleges admire passion, discipline, and kindness. By doing your best to incorporate these into your application, your odds can easily multiply many times over.

How Do I Get Into An Ivy League College?

Acceptance into any Ivy League university is challenging. Last year, Harvard received over 40,000 applicants. Yale saw over 35,000. Yes, it is hard. But it is far from impossible! More than 2,000 of those applicants received the good news when they opened their mailboxes in March.

Nearly all college admissions officers agree that the most important part of any application is the high school transcript. Contrary to popular belief, colleges are not looking for perfection. Instead, they are looking for passion, hard work, and character. That means you should challenge yourself academically, maybe by taking some AP or IB courses, but do not feel the need to push yourself beyond what is reasonable. Instead, focus on what most inspires you, then choose your classes and extracurriculars accordingly. Finally, take special care in the writing portions of your application to make sure your passion shines through.

Can I Get Into Harvard? Yale? Brown?

Each university’s admissions office has its own strategy for choosing who to accept. While acceptance rates vary across the Ivy League, the application pool for all of them is very competitive. Our college chances calculator can help you get a better feel for your personal odds of getting into one of these colleges. That said, any percentage for admissions rates you find on our college chances calculator is no guarantee of your probability of acceptance. Our tool has not been endorsed by any college admissions office within the Ivy League or otherwise. Instead, our college chances calculator is meant to provide a general indicator of your admission chances based on some components of your application.

To improve your odds of admission into a specific university, there are a few strategies. Some colleges track whether you have visited their campus or sat in on an information session, because those indicate how interested you are in their college. Otherwise, one of the best ways to improve your odds at a specific school is to spend lots of time on the essay component of their application. Research the college’s values, and write about how your activities, passions, and character align with those values.


Does My ACT Score Matter? Does My SAT Score Matter?

Most college are looking to create a very diverse student body across all different metrics. For example, many of them try to get at least one student from each US state and multiple countries. That is to say that ACT and SAT scores are not all that colleges value. Colleges want students that come from all walks of life, and all of whom show passion, hard work, and character. The ACT and SAT are only one piece of that puzzle.

The short answer is yes, the ACT and SAT matter, but not as much as most people think. Most colleges use the ACT or SAT score as a basic test for a student’s ability to work hard. However, once an applicant shows that, it is really up to the rest of their application to show whether they should get that acceptance letter. Focus on doing well on the ACT or SAT, but realize it is only one component of your application. Do not let the time you spend studying overtake other parts of your application that show your dedication and passion.

Which Colleges Should I Apply To?

Most college counselors suggest student create a list that includes three kinds of colleges: “likelies,” “possiblies,” and “reaches.” “Likelies” are colleges that you feel confident you can get into, “possiblies” are college that you might be able to get into, and “reaches” are colleges that are extremely challenging to gain acceptance to. (For reference, Ivy League acceptance rates are so low, most counselors consider them “reaches” for everyone.)

In addition to having a healthy balance of “likelies,” “possiblies,” and “reaches,” you should consider these other characteristics when choosing which colleges to apply to:

Location: Think about if you would like to be close to your hometown or far away. How about in a large city or a small college town?

School Size: Consider whether you would like a college with 2,000 undergraduates, 40,000, or somewhere in between. You might also be someone who doesn’t mind either way!

Interests: If you know what subject area you might study, research which schools have a strong program in that subject. You might surprise yourself!

Culture: Reflect on whether you want to go to a party school or would like a quieter environment. Also look at the types of clubs, arts, or sports the college has!


Should I Apply Early Decision or Regular Decision?

There are two main types of early applications. Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, and the University of Pennsylvania have early decision, which means that if you apply early, then get in, you must attend to that college. Harvard University, Princeton University, and Yale University have early action, which allows you to apply early, but does not force you to attend if you get in. Also worth noting is that Harvard, Yale, and Princeton are “single choice early action” (SCEA), meaning you can only apply to their school in the early rounds. Most early decision schools let you apply to as many other colleges early as you want, as long as they are not also early decision.There are two main types of early applications. Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, and the University of Pennsylvania have early decision, which means that if you apply early, then get in, you must attend to that college. Harvard University, Princeton University, and Yale University have early action, which allows you to apply early, but does not force you to attend if you get in. Also worth noting is that Harvard, Yale, and Princeton are “single choice early action” (SCEA), meaning you can only apply to their school in the early rounds. Most early decision schools let you apply to as many other colleges early as you want, as long as they are not also early decision.

Early decision and early action acceptance rates are typically higher than regular decision acceptance rates. One reason is that more qualified students tend to apply in the early rounds, so more students meet the expectations of the admissions officers. Colleges insist their standards for admission are not any lower for the early round, but most colleges like to admit lots of students early so that they can make as many top students commit to their school as possible.

All in all, you should apply to a college early if you feel confident it is your top choice. Do NOT apply early decision if you are not sure you would definitely attend that college if you got in. However, applying early could be a great opportunity to get a let up on the competition for a school you could really see yourself spending the next four years.

Which College Should I Choose?

Each college offers a unique student experience. If you have already gained acceptance to a college, congratulations! Hopefully now you have no bad options, and you are just trying to find the best place for you. The best way to learn about a college is browsing their website, visiting their campus, and speaking student or faculty there. Through your research, ask yourself the following:

Do I like this location? Could I feel at home here for four years?

How do I feel about the size of the school? Is this the social experience I am looking for?

Could I find my passion here? And if I do, can I explore it more deeply?

Do I want this type of student culture? Are there any clubs here I’d want to join?

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